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Bachelor of General Studies Online

Complete Coursework: varies  |  Credit Hours: 124 total  |  Tuition: $350 per credit hour

Overview

Follow your passions, talents and career goals! Our online Bachelor of General Studies degree program allows you to combine your various fields of interest with any previously earned college credits to truly design your own degree. Students in the Bachelor of General Studies online program will choose three areas of emphasis in which to focus their studies.

This unique interdisciplinary program offers you an education relevant to your passions and career aspirations while providing the support and guidance you need to succeed. With our 100% online courses, supportive faculty and diverse course offerings, you will have the flexibility to complete your degree at your own pace.

Courses

In order to graduate from Eastern Michigan University with a Bachelor of General Studies degree, students must complete 124 total credit hours included in the Bachelor of Studies degree plan. Coursework must include at least 30 credit hours taken at EMU, 15 hours of which must be at the 300/400 level.

The BGS online degree program requires students to organize coursework into three distinct, clearly defined areas of emphasis, with at least 20 credit hours per area. An area of emphasis may include courses from one or several departments, provided the courses are consistent with the area’s focus. Students will work with an advisor to create an Individualized Studies Program to outline coursework.

To see the full list of our Bachelor of General Studies online courses, view courses.

Admissions

Applicants to the Bachelor of General Studies online program with 12 or more transferable credits from a previously attended college or university must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher on previous college coursework.

If you have fewer than 12 transferable credits, you will also need to submit an official (in sealed envelope) high school transcript or GED score report and your ACT or SAT scores for evaluation.

To learn more about our Bachelor of General Studies online admission requirements, view admissions.

Tuition

Tuition for the Bachelor of General Studies online program is $350 per credit hour, including fees. There is also a nonrefundable $35 application fee. Tuition is the same for students living inside or outside Michigan and is paid by the course.

To learn more about our Bachelor of General Studies online tuition, view tuition.

Calendar

With multiple start dates each year, the Bachelor of General Studies online degree program is convenient and accessible. After selecting your desired start date, you should review deadlines for completing your application, turning in all required documentation and fees, registering for classes and paying tuition.

To see the full calendar of upcoming start dates for the Bachelor of General Studies online, view calendar.

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Courses

To graduate with the Bachelor of General Studies degree from Eastern Michigan University, students must complete 124 credit hours total. Students will work with an advisor to create an Individualized Studies Program that incorporates previously earned college credits and outlines required coursework to define their specific degree plan.

The Bachelor of General Studies requires that at least 30 credit hours of courses be taken at EMU, 15 hours of which must be at the 300/400 level. This coursework must be distributed equally over the three areas of emphasis. Graduate-level courses may be used to satisfy this requirement, subject to Graduate School approval. ESLN courses may not be used to fulfill this requirement. Note: at least 42 credit hours in the degree plan must come from 4-year institutions, including EMU.

The BGS online degree program requires students to organize coursework into three distinct, clearly defined areas of emphasis, with at least 20 credit hours per area. An area of emphasis may include courses from one or several departments, provided the courses are consistent with the area’s focus.

For examples of general education courses and courses from selected areas of emphasis that students may choose from, see course lists, below. Course availability may vary according to academic calendar and/or start date.

Example BGS Courses

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Visual culture is an important means of expression and communication in the contemporary world. From advertisements to traffic signs, from television shows to food packaging, visual communication is used today to inform, manipulate and record social, political and economic values of our society. The visual culture of today is an extension and evolution of the visual culture of the past. Art is a primary means by which people throughout the world have been recording and relating their cultural values, philosophies, social identities and historical development. Art appreciation is the skill by which one can read, understand and enjoy these works of art. Through an understanding of important works of art, and the great artists who produced them, this course will be of value in the critical and intellectual understanding of the evolution of our history.

A student who successfully completes this course will learn how aesthetics, history, the visual vocabulary of art, the relationship between content and form and the dynamics of the visual language are the necessary means by which we increase our knowledge and awareness of ourselves, our culture and the world in which we live. Through the examination of important works of art, students will learn the essential descriptive vocabularies of the visual arts, how formal properties (style) shape and inform the content of a given work of art. Students will develop an ability to decode iconographic symbols and stylistic conventions that are culturally and historically specific, as well as symbols and intentions specific to particular artists and their work.

Global food supply issues can be understood within the context of culture. This course explores factors influencing global food supply including: religion, culture, society, agricultural and livestock capabilities, environmental changes affecting food sources, malnutrition, overfeeding, fair trade agreements for growers/producers, food availability, industrialization, traditional health beliefs and intercultural communication.

This class provides a basic understanding of the nature of the lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere for non-science majors. Emphasis is on understanding the dynamic processes that affect the earth and how to apply this knowledge to everyday life.

A survey of the major concepts and subfields in modern geography. Physical, cultural, economic, political and social geography are among the major areas explored.

Geographic evaluation of the human imprint on the world, focusing on how peoples of various societies have approached the problems of living in their natural environments and with each other. A requirement for both the major and minor in geography.

A study of United States history through the Reconstruction following the Civil War.

Reading and critical analysis of prose fiction intended to deepen the student’s understanding and enjoyment of prose fiction.

An introduction to philosophy by the study of important philosophical thinkers, problems and methodologies.

An overview of the structure and function of American national government, focusing on how government is designed, how individuals form and act on their political preferences, how these preferences are transmitted to government, and how government acts (and does not act) on what its citizens want.

Principles, theories and methods evolving from the scientific analysis of behavior.

This course provides an overview of the main issues confronting women in the United States today. Topics covered may include patriarchy and oppression, media images, violence, work, sexuality, feminism and commonalities and differences of women from different racial/ethnic and class backgrounds.

This course will introduce students to the way in which society constructs gender and sexual identity, and the way in which, in turn, gender and sexuality shape our understanding of the world and ourselves. Topics will include femininity and masculinity, as well as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender history and experience.

An introduction to policy issues, theories and strategies regarding the fields of criminal justice and criminology.

The course will focus on the legal definitions of pornography, censorship versus freedom of speech, the types of pornography that are policed (e.g., violent or child pornography), police strategies, criminal versus social action as well as the relationship between harm, consent, criminal behavior and hate crimes.

An examination of corrections/punishment in contemporary society, its historical development, structural dependency, relationship to the system of justice and problems of effectiveness.

The social and historical origin of the police; police culture, role and career; police in the legal system; police discretion; ethical development of police; police and the community; police organization and community control.

How much do you know about nutrition and its impact on health, disease and lifestyle? This course will help you develop skills to critically evaluate the role of nutrition in a healthy lifestyle by providing an overview of nutrients, their functions, relationship to health and disease and explain how culture and society influences one’s nutritional status.

Orientation to dietetics profession by exploring its roles in the health care system, examining the different facets and specializations of the profession and investigating the past, present, future trends. Ethics and evidenced-based practice are also emphasized.

A study of current nutrition, fitness and other lifestyle strategies to promote healthy living. Students will examine their own health and wellness status, learn to choose healthful behaviors, become familiar with resources, and develop skills and habits that will support a healthy lifestyle now and in the future.

A study of the functions and sources of nutrients as well as their role in health; topics include digestion, absorption and metabolism of energy nutrients; vitamin and mineral structure and function; energy balance and weight maintenance; eating disorders; nutrition and disease; food safety; and the world food situation.

This course meets the requirements for a social sciences course in the General Education Program because it covers regional American foods and the history, culture, food products and cuisines of 15 culinary regions. The culinary regions are defined through geography, homogeneous food culture of indigenous people, the food culture of first settlers, foods and cooking techniques brought by immigrants and economic viability.

Course covers the biochemical and metabolic processing of dietary carbohydrates, fats and proteins as well as their functions within the human body. Emphasis is on the biochemical reactions involved in nutrient digestion, absorption and metabolism, including their relationships to nutrition status, human health and disease.

Global food supply issues can be understood within the context of culture. This course explores factors influencing global food supply including: religion, culture, society, agricultural and livestock capabilities, environmental changes affecting food sources, malnutrition, overfeeding, fair trade agreements for growers/producers, food availability, industrialization, traditional health beliefs and intercultural communication.

Course places emphasis on evidence-based nutrient needs, cultural diversity, and health needs for each of the physiological stages of the life cycle in populations, groups and individuals.

This course provides students with an overview of current complementary medicine techniques applied to an integrative medicine framework.

The focus of this course is on community-based nutrition policies and programs as well as nutrition education. Students will examine federal, state and local nutrition programs and plan a nutrition education program.

This course emphasizes the role of the nutrition entrepreneur in the conceptualization, planning and marketing for a start-up enterprise or private practice. The course will focus on developing a business plan for a new venture and will consider legal and ethical issues.

An introduction to the study of climate and its variability through time. We will discuss how the climate system works, examine past climate changes and possible causes, investigate the current global warming and its effect on the environment and human population, and analyze predicted changes for the future and possible solutions.

This class provides a basic understanding of the nature of the lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere for non-science majors. Emphasis is on understanding the dynamic processes that affect the earth and how to apply this knowledge to everyday life.

This laboratory class accompanies ESSC 108 and covers applications of the scientific method of inquiry as applied to earth sciences to reinforce basic concepts (as taught in ESSC 108).

This course is an introduction to the Earth system and its components. It utilizes the scientific method to address composition of the Earth system, fundamental processes within the Earth system and linkages between all components of the system. Course includes consideration of how humans impact and are impacted by the Earth system.

An introduction to the geology of U.S. National Parks and Monuments, this course covers application of the scientific method of inquiry to the basic geologic processes responsible for their formation.

Course includes analysis of devastating earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, violent storms, freezes and other environmental catastrophes, emphasizing their causes and human adjustments to those events.

This course is a study of physical, chemical and biological elements of rivers, lakes, wetlands and groundwater, and the economic, social, political and legal issues currently associated with these systems. Required for the hydrogeology major.

Course is a study of the world’s oceans, including coasts, waves, currents, tides, sediments, marine geology, properties of seawater, the energy balance, oceanographic research techniques and marine resources, stressing physical oceanography.

This course is a study of the principles, elements and practices underlying effective business communication. The course focuses on approaches for planning, creating and transmitting business information within a variety of business situations found in the global marketplace.

Course covers industrial relations functions in a business organization including recruitment, selection, placement, training, motivation and appraisal of personnel, along with a scientific approach to the solution of practical problems of industrial manpower utilization.

Course is a survey of the theory and practice of Organizational Behavior to better understand and manage people at work through an interdisciplinary examination of individual, group and organizational issues. Critical topics are ethics, groups and teams, motivation, leadership, feedback, culture, diversity, organizational design and change.

This course emphasizes the role of the entrepreneur in making integrated managerial and growth decisions for a start-up enterprise. The focus will be on developing a business plan for a new venture.

Course provides a theoretical framework of key managerial communication concepts, skills used to diagnose communication problems and to communicate corporate policies.

Leadership theories and practice will provide students with knowledge of the theories of leadership as well as practice in leadership and management. Several diagnostic techniques will be used to help students understand their own leadership strengths and areas to be developed.

Course covers the social, legal and moral pressures of external and community groups on business operations, management’s role of responsibility and leadership in interacting with these forces, and reducing and resolving conflicts with them.

Course covers integration and analytical application of fundamental areas of business-to-case problems as well as policy issues in the identification and resolution of problem situations.

This course focuses on such issues as global management in a cultural context, breaking down international business barriers, motivation in a global context, management of culture shock, international conflict management, management and cultural synergy, and business communication practice and traditions in specific national settings.

An overview of the structure and function of American national government, focusing on how government is designed, how individuals form and act on their political preferences, how these preferences are transmitted to government, and how government acts (and does not act) on what its citizens want.

This course examines global concerns that transcend boundaries of local and national communities. It emphasizes global perspectives and approaches to analyzing and solving world problems. Each semester will focus on a particular contemporary global issue (such as terrorism, genocide, human rights, global gender issues, ethnic identity/conflict, migration and democratization).

This course is a study of the forms and functions of state and local governments with special emphasis on the government of Michigan—especially valuable for teachers of social studies in senior and junior high schools.

Course develops conceptual tools for comparative analysis of diverse political systems, examining selected nation-states to identify and explain similarities and differences in regime types and patterns of politics. It also examines the interaction of global forces (such as colonialism, the Cold War, and global markets) with domestic social and political change.

This course is an introduction to major theories and approaches in the study of international relations. The course considers the character of the international system, causes of conflict and war, foreign policy decision-making, determinants of economic development, and global environmental degradation. It also examines current issues such as terrorism, the protection of human rights, and globalization.

Students will survey how a wide variety of groups and individuals sought and currently seek legal protection and recognition through the Constitution, judicial interpretation, and legislation. Exposure to these struggles will allow the student to experience a wide range of perspectives and critique how the legal system and society has dealt with clashes between diverse elements of the U.S.

Course surveys various civil law components of American law and how they impact individuals and society. Special emphasis is placed upon critical legal, political and societal questions raised by property rights, family law, personal injury liability, and judicial process.

This course explores the political and legal processes that shape the development and interpretation of major constitutional principles. We will discuss the sources and context for American law and examine how actors in the legal and political systems across all levels of government contribute to the laws that govern American society.

Principles, theories and methods evolving from the scientific analysis of behavior.

Course examines basic concepts and methods used in the analysis of psychological data along with methods of describing and drawing inferences from sets of data.

Course investigates the order and regularity underlying processes of human interaction including motives, attitudes, social norms and roles, the socialization process, personality and group membership, and the effect of group membership upon individual behavior.

Course covers modern theories of the origin of mental disorders and personality disturbances, nature and mechanism of the various forms of abnormal behavior, prevention and treatment and social significance of aberrations.

This course will provide the student with an understanding of technology management issues and introduce students to the necessary aspects required to manage a technological enterprise.

The implementation of new technology within organizations often requires substantial changes in organizational, group and individual work processes. This course will present change frameworks that enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of technology change and implementation. It will integrate materials from several disciplines including organizational development, management, industrial engineering and organizational science.

This course will introduce the student to the varying aspects of information technology management in organizations. Emphasis will be placed on the technical and organizational foundations of information systems along with contemporary approaches to building and managing information systems and their respective support systems.

The purpose of this course is to describe an approach to process improvement that integrates technical aspects of industrial engineering with social psychological dimensions of work processes. The course will delineate ideas for strategically incorporating technology levers into plans for improving work processes on an individual and work group level.

This course is a study of the core subjects of project management as they relate to the management of technology-oriented projects using communication technologies that enable virtual teams to function in a global work environment.

This course will allow students to synthesize the structure and procedures of strategic management and project management. The course will integrate the ideas and information presented in other courses within the technology management concentration core. Students will demonstrate their ability to integrate information ascertained from previous classes within a capstone project.

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Admissions

To pursue the Bachelor of General Studies degree, students will work with an advisor to create an Individualized Studies Program based on academic interests and any courses transferred into Eastern Michigan University.

BGS Online Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Bachelor of General Studies online program with 12 or more transferable credits from a previously attended college or university must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher on previous college coursework.

If you have fewer than 12 transferable credits, you will need to submit an official high school transcript or GED score report and your ACT or SAT scores for evaluation.

If you need to submit official documents by mail, send them to:

Office of Admissions
Eastern Michigan University
P.O. Box 921
Ypsilanti, MI 48197

Documentation can be sent via email to: transcripts_admissions@emich.edu.

Have a question? Call us at 844-351-9389.

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Tuition

The following is the tuition breakdown for students pursuing a Bachelor of General Studies online. The tuition is the same for in-state and out-of-state students. The tuition cost includes all fees.

Program Per Credit Hour Per 3-Credit Hour Course
Bachelor of General Studies $350 $1,050
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Calendar

Session Program Start Date Application Deadline Document Deadline Registration Deadline Payment Deadline
Spring I January 3, 2018 December 13, 2017 December 20, 2017 December 28, 2017 December 29, 2017
Summer I May 2, 2018 April 11, 2018 April 18, 2018 April 27, 2018 April 30, 2018
Summer II June 22, 2018 June 1, 2018 June 8, 2018 June 19, 2018 June 20, 2018
Fall I September 5, 2018 August 15, 2018 August 22, 2018 August 30, 2018 August 31, 2018
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